Short Bio of Soviet Spy, Jean-Louis Gagnon

Jean-Louis Gagnon

Jean-Louis Gagnon

In Part Three of my Audio Transcript of highlights from Alan Stang’s April 1971 article in American Opinion, “CANADA – How The Communists Took Control,” Stang likens Jean-Louis Gagnon to “Joseph Goebbels” and “Spiro Agnew”. Says Stang in “The Rest Of The Ring” segment:

Pierre has created Information Canada, named Gagnon to run it at $40,000 a year. Jean-Louis doesn’t really need it, because his father, like Pierre’s, was also a millionaire. Trudeau has also appointed Gagnon Co-Chairman of the influential Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism.

Who is Jean-Louis Gagnon? He is a former Managing Editor of La Presse, one of Canada’s largest dailies. He is a former Editor-in-Chief of L’Evènement-Journal. He is a frequent commentator on the C.B.C. He is still another contributor to Cité Libre.

And he is a dues-paying member of the Communist Party.

[ …. ]

Jean-Louis has been a speaker at many Communist meetings. As you see on Page 14, for instance, he was one of two speakers at a meeting of the Labor Youth Federation — previously known as the Young Communist League. The other, as you see, was Fred Rose, an officer in G.R.U. (Soviet military intelligence), who later was convicted and sent to the penitentiary for Soviet espionage. Rose was one of Gagnon’s bosses in the Party. You also see on Page 14 the telegram Gagnon sent from Washington to Montreal, May 1, 1946, expressing his adoration of “the great Soviet Union.”

The papers brought by Igor Gouzenko to the Canadians from the Soviet Embassy in Ottawa revealed that it was Jean-Louis Gagnon who had supplied Soviet Colonel Zabotin with the information that the exact date of D-Day was June 6, 1944.

[ …. ]

Gagnon’s wife, Hélène, is on the payroll of Peking, where she has been Mao Tse-tung’s guest, and that Pravda pays her through Bucharest, where she goes to pick it up. “

Google Newspapers is proving to be a bit of a treasure-trove for “period pieces” on Jean-Louis Gagnon. Many are in French, and so I have translated this one, by French journalist, J.-P. Robillard, who interviewed Gagnon in 1956, while the latter was working for CKAC radio station.

During the interview, Gagnon hands Robillard a short CV, which Robillard then publishes to lead off his article, titled simply:

Jean-Louis Gagnon“.

As a journalist, Communist Party member Gagnon covers two of the major conferences which led to the set-up of the Communist-infiltrated UN.

In the bio given to Robillard, Gagnon amusingly glosses over his 1946 sudden change of occupation, city, and country, from journalist in Canada to “advertising manager” in Rio de Janeiro for a company called “Brazilian Traction”. He fudges the language in French, so you can’t tell he actually left Canada and went to Brazil for this odd position.

I know from another source, which I will get for you later, that in 1946, when Gagnon fled the country on the heels of revelations by Igor Gouzenko of a Soviet spy ring operating in Canada, it was apparently Mitchell Sharp who arranged for Gagnon’s job with Brazilian Traction. Sharp thus helped Gagnon escape the spy trials that would ensue in Ottawa.

Sharp went on to have a political career in Canada under both Soviet spy Pearson and Soviet mole Trudeau, as a “Liberal”:

PARLINFO – SHARP, The Hon. Mitchell William, P.C., C.C., B.A., D.Sc., LL.D.

And they call them “The Honorable”.

A couple of facts I have to stitch together:

Pierre Trudeau and Jean-Louis Gagnon apparently have a long-standing friendship, which precedes their stint together infiltrating Canadian politics.

Both Pierre Trudeau and Jean-Louis Gagnon were trained by the Jesuits.

Mitchell Sharp will join David Rockefeller’s Trilateral Commission.

Mitchell Sharp will be Pierre Trudeau’s advisor (whispering in his ear at the 1968 Liberal Leadership Convention, which returns Soviet mole Pierre as Prime Minister of Canada while Red spy Pearson conveniently resigns):

Click here to read Jean-Louis Gagnon now.

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The Featherbed File: Trudeau Squelches Own RCMP File

INSIDE THE FEATHERBED FILE: Treason in the Civil Service
by RCMP Undercover Officer Patrick Walsh

BAMBOOZLED JOE CLARK

Pierre Elliott Trudeau

Pierre Elliott Trudeau

It was his home-town publication, The Gazette, which pinpointed how secret Orders-in-Council were used by Trudeau to ensure that the new Prime Minister Joe Clark would be bamboozled into an agreement whereby the hitherto unpublished portions of the Gouzenko report as well as the subsequent Featherbed File remained sealed for at least 20 years.

Following, are excerpts from a report published in the 1 October 1979 issue of The Montreal Gazette:

In a secret Order-in-Council issued in his last days as Prime Minister, PierreTrudeau ordered all the police intelligence files on him and his Cabinet colleagues be sealed for at least 20 years, The Gazette has learned.

The files were part of a top-secret investigation called ‘Operation Featherbed’ that was started by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in the early 1960s.

Prime Minister Joe Clark agreed in a letter dated June 2 that Trudeau’s final Order-in-Council would be respected, an undertaking which has angered some Conservative MPs.

Repeated efforts by Trudeau and other senior Liberals to gain access to the Featherbed files were turned down by the RCMP security branch. But senior members of the security service have told the Gazette that the files include material on the private lives of influential Canadian figures, their past political affiliations, contacts with agents of foreign powers, private weaknesses or vices and even sexual practices. [Emphasis added]

Trudeau’s decision to issue an Order-in-Council sealing this Featherbed material just four days after the last federal election, but while he was still Prime Minister, also brought sharp rebukes from his former Cabinet colleagues.

There was such an uproar from backbenchers in the short-lived Clark government over this ‘Operation Cover-Up’ that pressure from the grassroots finally forced PM Joe Clark to make an amazing statement concerning the suppressed Featherbed File. The following excerpts are from a Toronto Star report, 1 December 1979:

The Prime Minister (Clark) said he has no intention of ever making the (Featherbed) file public. ‘Were we to publish that, we would be giving credence to gossip that affects people, some of whom are still in Ottawa, he told a news conference.

Clark’s blunt remarks conflict with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and back-bench MPs in his own party who maintain that the files show direct links between government officials and the Communist party.

Several MPs in the last month have demanded the government review the Taschereau Papers, secret records of a Royal Commission investigation of the 1946 Igor Gouzenko spy case, and check out reports that a ‘fifth man’ in the Anthony Blunt Soviet spy ring in Britain was Canadian.

Accusations also surfaced in Parliament this week that Jean-Louis Gagnon, a member of the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission, was connected with subversive groups…

The Sunday Star (Toronto), 7 June 1981, published a significant story by reporter John Picton. The first part of his report confirmed much of the Ottawa-based treason I have already mentioned, and then continued:

Lawrence also told the Sunday Star about the time he says he was asked not to check the Trudeau files.

He said he was approached ‘early on in the game’ (meaning Clark’s term of office) by a man who’d been appointed as custodian of Trudeau’s cabinet documents.

Under a so-called ‘convention,’ leaders of incoming governments traditionally have signed an agreement not to delve into cabinet papers of an outgoing administration.

Tory leader Joe Clark signed such an agreement – drawn tip by Trudeau’s office – the night before he was sworn in as prime minister.

Before signing, Clark wanted to consult Lawrence since he was appointing him solicitor-general, but couldn’t find him (‘I don’t know why he couldn’t find me’).

Some Tory MPs – Lawrence among them – think that was a mistake because the agreement, they allege, went much farther than any previous pact and effectively locked away many more papers than just cabinet documents.

(Tory MP Tom Cossitt describes the signing as ‘a grave error’).

‘He (the custodian) asked me specifically not to request documents relating to Trudeau’s personal life,’ Lawrence said. He said the RCMP had them, like past history associations.

‘They related to security questions about Trudeau himself in his younger days,’ when Trudeau was a world traveller.

The custodian – named by Lawrence but unavailable for comment -‘was obviously perturbed about he availability to me of these documents, and he indicated to me it would be a blow below the belt if I started looking at those.’

Lawrence wouldn’t say if he did look at them.

…. Cossitt (the Tory MP) also says that one of Trudeau’s last acts as prime minister in 1979, before handing over office to Clark, was to sign an order-in-council preventing the McDonald commission into RCMP wrongdoing from seeing certain cabinet documents without his permission.

The agreement Clark signed ensured that the order would stand.

But, says Lawrence, that agreement covered far more than cabinet documents. As solicitor-general he’d tried to see documents relating to the 35-year-old Gouzenko spy case dealing with a Soviet espionage ring.

Civil servants wouldn’t show them to him because of a previous order from Trudeau’s office.

When Lawrence asked officials why certain ‘security breaches’ weren’t prosecuted, he was told that was the policy of the day. The reasons for that policy were locked away in cabinet papers.

‘I was given reports on what happened, but not on the reasons for the government decisions on why they didn’t prosecute. Canadian governments have hushed up all sorts of things.’

Lawrence added: ‘One of the weird aspects of this is that we can see more about our affairs in other countries than we can see in Canada.’

So much for the Star report which confirms three decades of warnings by Canadian Intelligence publications that treason has been riding high in Ottawa. It also confirms the fact that Joe Clark was so politically immature that Old Machiavelli, before handing over the keys to him for a brief interlude in 1979, tricked young Joe into actually covering up the Featherbed File scandal and thus unwittingly becoming himself a party to treason.

It was, as Mr. Lawrence implies, the civil servants, still under the former PM’s ‘orders,’who called the tune, not the ministers in the Clark Government!

TRUTH IS FINALLY EMERGING

The Edmonton Journal (30 March 1981) concluded an article on Lester Pearson’s cover-up for Soviet spy John Watkins:

A remaining question is why Pearson and the Liberal hierarchy decided to cover up for Watkins.

Was it simply because Pearson and Watkins were huge personal friends?’

If so, this meant that Pearson’s own priorities came ahead of those of Canadians in general would lead to many more exposures and create shattering embarrassment for the Liberal bureaucracy?’

E. D. Ward-Harris, Editor of the Victoria Times-Colonist, reviewing Chapman Pincher’s remarkable book, Their Trade is Treachery, in the 30 May 1981 issue, says that the mind ‘boggles’ at the extent of Soviet penetration in high government circles, and adds: ‘Why, after reading this book it wouldn’t surprise me to learn that some Western president or prime minister had been recruited by the KGB in his youth and was taking his orders from Moscow Centre through a handy controller. It wouldn’t surprise me at all.’

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